Colony Collapse Disorder

We are stewards in this world, and we have responsibilities.  On a very simple level, a global responsibility would be to keep pollinators of all types alive, as they are fundamental workers for our food supply. With no pollinators, there is no food. If there is no food, that’s that for us. Farms, ranches, backyard gardens and wild berries, done for. Feeding everyone in our own communities will be a lost dream, and feeding those in other places a mere wish.

Not only are 34% of bee colonies disappearing every year, these persistent pesticides are harming other pollinators at significant rates. Among them is the beautiful and graceful praying mantis (Mantis religiosa), which naturally eats aphids, mosquitoes, beetles, spiders and more.

In a study conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences of the National Institutes of Health and the Parkinson’s Institute in Sunnyvale, California, they found that two pesticides, rotenone and paraquat increased the rates of developing Parkinson’s Disease by 2.5 times over people who did not use them. Many similar studies have since been conducted showing the same result. Rotenone works by inhibiting mitochondrial function, the cell structure responsible for making cell energy. Many conditions, such as Autism, Parkinson’s disease, Diabetes mellitus, Optic neuropathy, Multiple sclerosis, Deafness, Ataxia, Dementia and some other muscle degenerative diseases have at their root, mitochondrial dysfunction. Will mitochondrial mutations from environmental exposure to pesticides become a new acquired AND inherited disease of the modern world?

Or maybe, it just takes a crisis, of unlimited proportion, to wake humanity to get on with living life and enough of this nonsense! We are at a tipping point, will it be for death, destruction and greed or will it usher in a new era of responsibility as we move into roles of caring for Life and being mindful stewards? Whether it is our brain at stake, or our DNA, or our pollinators and our food, it is all an interdependent system, enmeshed in itself, as viewed from every possible angle.
Clothianidin, a neonicotinoid that persists in the environment for decades, approved by the EPA with almost nothing in the way of concern for Life or even the principle of sound, scientific research:

http://www.grist.org/article/food-2010-12-10-leaked-documents-show-epa-allowed-bee-toxic-pesticide-

Dan Rather on Pesticides and Bees:

http://www.panna.org/blog/dan-rather-pesticides-bees

From Barbara J:

— http://www.fastcompany.com/1709815/why-has-the-epa-allowed-a-bee-killing-pesticide-to-stay-on-the-market — and what many people suspect may be one of the root causes of CCD for honeybees.  Personally, I suspect CCD is probably the result of the vast number of assaults (mites, chemicals, GMO’s, HFCS feedings, mono-crop pollinations, etc.) the honeybees have endured.  But I’m pretty sure this particular pesticide is one of the biggest abuses heaped on the honeybees (and probably other beneficial insects as well).  It is infuriating that the EPA is so willing to bow to corporate pressure and contributions and allow this pesticide to be used freely in the USA, even as other countries have banned its use.

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH
Advertisements

the egg

the egg doesn’t
sit too far
from
the motherbird of
insanity

Summer Michaelson

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Music

Music is a proposition,
as it expresses
whatever is
and the rest
is simply
attachment of notions.
(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Before

Before their time was due
I cut large heads
of sunflowers so gay
that greeted my summer mornings
hello
and pressed against
my window to sleep.
(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Musings on some Visions of a Sun-Drenched World

There are visions of a Sun-Drenched World on the horizon, something so simple that it is creeping up on many of us, almost unnoticed. What I am speaking of is life; life rearranges itself as necessary to support a changing culture. There are so many issues and problems in the world, and we face new ones everyday that have no historical precedent! I often think what we perceive of as problems, is in actuality, life rearranging itself in ways to support new connections of cooperation and interdependence.

I have had a vision of our own, local community. What’s more interesting, is not that I had it, but I am finding others are having this vision as well. I have seen so many of our local churches, mosques and temples, schools, government facilities and community parks allocating their spaces and fine land with good soil for community gardens. I see people being offered the chance to be involved, but not coerced. I see churches and other local spaces offering opportunities to participate, that may include tea, conversation, peeling pears, harvesting carrots or writing cards, sending emails, or helping another brush their hair. I see something heart centered, that doesn’t expect, but brings together. I see small beginnings that overtime turn into organically grown large community undertakings. I see less needing to be said in the pulpit as the Teachings of Jesus Christ are just being lived. I see people cooking and caring for one another, but not from some imposed situation on the outside of themselves, but from inside their hearts. I see people, in their own time, and in their own way, being inspired, and come home to dig up suburban lawns for cultivated and wild edibles and beauty for butterflies and honey bees, people coming home to apartment balconies to grow tomatoes, jasmine flowers and tend to a bee hive, people coming home to single room sublets and caring for Cuban oregano in the window sill. Over time, a new way of living just emerges, organically from inside of people, as the changes sweep the community, not with terror and force and centralized focus on saviors, but just from individual hearts, opening up in response to the break down of boundaries between community organizations, an opening of being and doing, being an example and doing with love.

It’s a vision, a powerful vision yet so very simple, and yet, as with all visions, it doesn’t belong to me. These are given to many people. I might sound like a fool for sharing this, but then again, maybe it doesn’t matter how one “sounds”…maybe what matters is what is in the heart. I’m not so sure any political system can ever rule people from the outside, all the answers humanity and local communities need are in the heart.

Summer Michaelson

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Azure and a Workshop!

A long, end of summer HELLLOOO to all the wonderful folks out there! Thanks to all who braved the cool Pacific Northwest Drizzle today for a visit to lovely Storytree Farm! It was lovely seeing so many of you, and to those of you who watched Ben and Hunter make live ferments, THANK YOU for supporting their pickle making! It was wonderful to see Barbara J. out at the farm, sharing her bee knowledge, and I think this reminds me of the quality of life that can increase for everyone when part of a participating community, everybody doing their “thing” in an attitude of joy, which natural sharing and cooperation brings!

Things are changing, including quite a few leaves, and with that, is the next Azure Standard order announcement for October. Our cut-off date is in 10 days, on September 28th, at 4 PM for delivery on the following Monday, October 3rd. Pickup is from 2-8 PM.

As many of you may know, I have been working on creating a new website, but as with all things special, it is taking its own, sweet time. Well, truth be known, I have lots of catching up to do in the technological sector. For now, I have set up this little blog to share some writings, poems, recipes and workshop announcements!

There is an upcoming summertime herbs and food workshop this coming Saturday! Please come join us for fun!

This summertime herb class will cover fun, edible, sometimes delicious and sometimes strange concoctions that nourish the body and spirit. Together, we will prepare nourishing infusions, syrups, vinegars, medicinal honey’s and other fantastic, nurturing fun! This class is a ‘happening’ and hands on work-shop, so come prepared to roll up your sleeves and play! This class is also potluck, so please bring a dish to share, as well as your own mug, fork, spoon and napkin.
Be prepared to smell interesting smells, taste interesting tastes, and get your hands dirty with folklore!
When: Saturday, September 24th 2011
When: 6:30-8:30 PM
To register, please send an email to:
lemonlotus@gmail.com

Summer Michaelson

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Recipe: Pickled Italian Plums and Pears

An olde, olde recipe. Where did this recipe come from? Everywhere! There are versions of this recipe from China to Europe to America, and mighty fine it is!

This requires 2 lbs of sugar for every 2 cups of apple cider vinegar. Combine these two ingredients and heat until sugar dissolves. Take peeled, whole pears with stems intact, and layer in your pot. Simmer gently for approximately 2-3 hours covered, then, uncovered until reduced to your liking. Gently lift out whole pears with the stem and a spoon, place in a jar.

The pears will not stick to the bottom of a thick bottomed steel stockpot. Any extra syrup can be jarred for Asian sweet and sour dishes. The pears and plums are scrumptious on ice cream, or served with some whipped cream and toasted almond slices/slivers, shaved chocolate or a drizzle of fudge. One may add cinnamon sticks, cloves, and/or ginger for a syrup variation.

For plums, follow the same directions for the sweet and sour sauce, poke holes in their skins, then gently simmer the plums for a five minutes, with skins on, then jar or can them up.

These recipes are meant to be stored in cold storage like a root cellar, but can be stored in the refrigerator for a very long time. The syrup is great canned, in small half pint amounts for future food creations!

A great book recommendation that has pickled peach, pear and plum recipes is “Putting Food By” by Ruth Hertzberg,  Janet Greene and Beatrice Vaughan.

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

World Breathes

World breathes, Earth breathes, living on winds

Great God, Great Beauty, Lavender clumps, Hollyhock roots,

Sunflower stalks, Lemon soul balms

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Serendipty Plant Lore Workshop September, 24th 2011

This summertime herb class will cover fun, edible, sometimes delicious and sometimes strange concoctions that nourish the body and spirit. Together, we will prepare nourishing infusions, syrups, vinegars, medicinal honey’s and other fantastic, nurturing fun! This class is a ‘happening’ and hands on work-shop, so come prepared to roll up your sleeves and play! This class is also potluck, so please bring a dish to share, as well as your own mug, fork, spoon and napkin.
Be prepared to smell interesting smells, taste interesting tastes, and get your hands dirty with folklore!
When: Saturday, September 24th 2011
When: 6:30-8:30 PM
To register, please send an email to:
lemonlotus@gmail.com
(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Serendipity Plant Lore at Storytree Farm, September 17th, 2011!

We will be participating in the 13th annual WSU Harvest Celebration tour of Southwest Washington farms! You can find me at beautiful Storytree Farm. Please stop by and check out this fantastic, local CSA farm, that has beautiful crops, animals and trees. There will be lacto-fermenting, various pickling and herbal demonstrations from 10AM-3PM! For further inquiries, send an email and I will forward the WSU Harvest Celebration attachment. This is a FREE event, open to everyone! If you want to stop by our booth and give me some trouble or some of your extra garden produce, please do! 🙂

(c) 2011 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

« Older entries