There is No Tomorrow!

“There is No Tomorrow” is a beautiful, animated film, which is absolutely a labor of love from Dermot O’Connor. Please take the time to watch it and pass it on to your friends and family! It is absolutely incredible!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VOMWzjrRiBg

 

(c) 2012, Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

“Bee Love” Workshop down at Neighbor’s Market this Saturday!

“Bee” the Love you want to create in the world! Come join this workshop that celebrates the healing power of the charming honey bee.  We will craft and create fragrant and medicinal love poems that aid our bodies and souls amongst conversation of how we can return the favor and protect the nations of bees.

This class will have interesting smells and things to taste. We will also have a potluck, please bring a dish to share, your own plate, fork, spoon and mug and stories!

Where: Neighbor’s Market

Date: Saturday, February 18th, 2012

When: 2:30 PM-4 PM’ish

Cost: $35.00

Got Stinky Feet? Foot Odor Cures!

Got stinky feet? Look no further then! Foot odor depends on the causes and individual circumstance, how long a person has had it, the degree of severity and the root cause. However, if you’ve got this troublesome problem, here are a few things you can do in addition to strengthening your digestive organs!

Soak feet in a good salt water mixture, lukewarm water with redmond’s sea salt or other chemical free salt, at least 4 times a week. Do not rinse your feet after the soak, just dry feet well when done, the little bit o’ salt left on the feet helps to keep feet dry and will help to start drying out whatever fungus or bacteria is inhabiting the pores. Quarter up to a half cup of salt for a pan of foot soakin’ water.

If you suspect a fungal/bacterial infection, use garlic and ginger poultices on the feet whenever you can. Take garlic cloves (skin on is fine) and ginger slices, pulse a few times in a food processor with a splash of olive oil. Put into a gelly strainer bag or flour sack dish towel, and place on the bottoms of the feet. Wrap a cloth to keep in place, and place a warm pack on the feet. This helps to kill bad organisms and the garlic and ginger also bring blood down to the feet (farthest from the heart and most likely to have reduced blood flow, especially when sleeping). With increased blood flow, you get increased white blood cells in the feet to help digest junk. If this is a long standing infection, might have to do this until infection is gone.

If it is just generally foot odor from sweaty feet and moist shoes, place a homemade powder in your shoes. Put some drops of tea tree oil, lavender and rosemary essential oil into a pint canning jar filled with baking soda. Mix it up, and powder your shoes with this every night. Place a crumpled piece of paper in each shoe to absorb extra moisture. This helps to kill bacteria and fungi as well as deoderize.

Of course, it is always important for everyone to keep feet dry, dry your feet well when out of the shower, keep shoes warm and dry. You can pick and choose the strategies above or use them all if the problem is severe! The above strategies are not intended to screen, diagnose or cure any shoes, please bring your shoes to a proper cobbler if in doubt, and if the problem is extreme, you can always bring your problems to Saint Crispin, the patron saint of cobblers!

Summer Michaelson, Community Herbalist

c) 2012  Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Tamale Class, Saturday, February 11th!

Come and visit a veteran tamale maker and watch how tamales are made at home, with quality ingredients from scratch! Our instructor, Elizabeth, has been a tamale maker for 25 years. We will learn how to soak the husks, make masa, and how to build the tamal. The class will be topped off with a tamale meal, and each participant will be sent home with fresh, raw tamales!

In the instructor’s words, “Making tamales is a festive, communal event which is very fun to do with family and friends, especially at the holidays. It is very special to me which is why I want to share it.”

This class will have a tamale meal. Please be sure to bring your own utensils, plate and mug as well as a potluck addition to the meal. Gluten-free and grain-free side dishes, sour cream, salsa, or beverages will be most welcome. Also, please bring a container for taking your raw tamales home!

Date: February, 11th, 2012

When: 3:00 -5:00 PM

Cost: $35.00 + a side dish

Where: Upon registration, details will be provided!

Ethical Considerations in Feeding the World!

Let’s face it, many of us worry about getting food to nearly a sixth of the world’s population (extremely conservative estimate), and the need for food growing daily, globally. It’s a common discussion amongst many in various spiritual communities, as well as in any community of people that has an eye on what’s happening in agriculture. People often tend to think that donating more money, and volunteering more time and encouraging others to do so is what is needed, and surely, that is always part of the solution of helping. What if people are donating and volunteering for and to organizations that are trying to sincerely help those in impoverished communities, but actually are increasing the causes of long term starvation, malnourishment, and dependancy of populations on organizations and outsider communities that often, coincidently, have a financial stake or other gain not readily apparent?

The idea that we need to produce more food in the world, or change the type of food to some standarized fair, is killing the basis of human survival in the world, as well as dragging down the entire ecosystem with us! Hey, sometimes we need to wipe away the fantasies and realize, if you can’t help yourself on the personal level, stop buying into “saving the world” fantasies and paying for destruction. Some people might think this is a pretty strong statement! However, sometimes we need to share our truth as we see it, or we actually DEPRIVE the world of a viewpoint. Differing perspectives enlarge the vision of humanity, not contract it.

Unfortunately, just like the developed countries, poorer countries are becomming victmized by the last bastion of the green revolution of agriculture, which has turned into a nightmare on the planet. The three largest and uniform crops are now wheat, rice and maize. Genetically uniform crops are a disaster, although, they offer short term increases of yields. These short term yields are at the expense of soil, microbes, air, water, insects, animals, native plants and people. Trading now for a debt payable in the future generations. Survival is not about quantity, and contrary to popular belief, has never been. Quality has always been the deciding factor…quality and variety of plants, microbes, insects, fat and protein sources. Resilience of a food supply is a better predictor of both sustainability of human populations and the environment. Resilience includes genetic diversity of plant and animals, local, cheap, common, well adapted, suited genetically to people’s climates and bodies. It relies on many of the natural systems already existing, and is able to tune into the rhythms of a changing environment. Once implemented, it’s easy, natural and a part of life. It solves the pricing crisis. It solves food allergy conundrums. It reduces the use of oil and petrochemicals, and medicines and hospitalizations. Instead of improving health, health becomes a birthright. It builds up healthy, family supporting commerce within depleted communities, and keeps people in poorer nations on their land, as the caretakers that have always been and will need to be in the future.

What is this simple solution to what falsely seems like an incredibly complex crisis? Restore genetic diversity in agriculture, while combining knowledge of local soil building with traditional agricultural techniques and restoration of native plants in multiple hunter and gatherer regions. Sounds expensive? A drop in the bucket compared to what has been spent on the green revolution. Self sufficient communities do not require as much as we are made to believe. When people are nourished, with local food, fresh air and water, there is no end for what they can do for themselves. They become resilient communities able to help others. In the effort for foreign and even domestic aid, if we continue to deface the individuality of communities, we inadvertently, with our good intentions, take away from communities their livlihoods and means of survival, often their food cultural heritages, cause havoc on earth and her organisms, cause dependancy instead of self sufficiency, reduce food resiliency across the globe (a bad food year globally due to undiversified crops spells destruction of life as know it), and is ridiculous!

Please eat most of your food locally, because you do take imported food out of other mouths! Grow native and well adapted heirlooms or decent hybrids only. Share your abundance with others. Set the example in your own community, help poorer communities grow out of ideas of producing more food that robs the ecosystem and themselves of genetic diversity and encourage only those NGO’s that are working with communities to become self-sufficient using sustainable methods and all manners of local food production. This is how one protects and promotes the well being of vulnerable populations. This also protects everyone against huge food price shocks, and the attendant fear, fighting and problems, as well as corporate manipulations.

Never take for granted the blessings our Creator has given us! Keep a wary eye on people, organizations or politicians who devise single strategies for the impoverished. The best hope for this dear planet at this time is protecting and encouraging her innate diversity! If humanity would step back a tiny bit, the resiliency of life might have a chance to change and heal all of our communities!

Summer Michaelson, Community Herbalist

c) 2012 Summer L. Farkas Takacs Michaelson, CH

Tamale Class Saturday, February 11th!

Come and visit a veteran tamale maker and watch how tamales are made at home, with quality ingredients from scratch! Our instructor, Elizabeth, has been a tamale maker for 25 years. We will learn how to soak the husks, make masa, and how to build the tamal. The class will be topped off with a tamale meal, and each participant will be sent home with fresh, raw tamales!

In the instructor’s words, “Making tamales is a festive, communal event which is very fun to do with family and friends, especially at the holidays. It is very special to me which is why I want to share it.”

This class will have a tamale meal. Please be sure to bring your own utensils, plate and mug as well as a potluck addition to the meal. Gluten-free and grain-free side dishes, sour cream, salsa, or beverages will be most welcome. Also, please bring a container for taking your raw tamales home!

Date: February, 11th, 2012

When: 3:00 -5:00 PM

Cost: $35.00 + a side dish

Where: Upon registration, details will be provided!